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Publisher Description

The #1 international bestseller, from Umberto Eco, author of The Name of the Rose

“Vintage Eco . . . the book is a triumph.” – New York Review of Books

Nineteenth-century Europe—from Turin to Prague to Paris—abounds with the ghastly and the mysterious. Jesuits plot against Freemasons. Italian republicans strangle priests with their own intestines. French criminals plan bombings by day and celebrate Black Masses at night. Every nation has its own secret service, perpetrating forgeries, plots, and massacres. Conspiracies rule history. From the unification of Italy to the Paris Commune to the Dreyfus Affair to The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, Europe is in tumult and everyone needs a scapegoat. But what if, behind all of these conspiracies, both real and imagined, lay one lone man?

“[Eco] demonstrates once again that his is a voice that compels our attention” – San Francisco Chronicle

“Choreographed by a truth that is itself so strange a novelist need hardly expand on it to produce a wondrous tale . . . Eco is to be applauded for bringing this stranger-than-fiction truth vividly to life.” – New York Times

“Classic Eco, with a difference.” – Los Angeles Times
This e-book includes a sample chapter of NAME OF THE ROSE.

GENRE
Fiction & Literature
RELEASED
2011
November 8
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
464
Pages
PUBLISHER
HMH Books
SELLER
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company
SIZE
20.7
MB

Customer Reviews

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The Prague Cemetery

Whether lost, diluted, or deformed in translation, any artistry in the construction and flow of Eco's prose is not to be found in The Prague Cemetery. Readers expecting a thrilling, erudite fictional exploration of Freemasonry and The Protocols of the Elders of Zion had better look elsewhere. The plot boils down to a account of the origin of the controversial Protocols from the vantage of the Eco's protagonist. This may be a worthy starting point for a compelling story, but does not suffice on it's own to drive a plot. Eco throws in a few murders and some split personalities to further contrive things, none of which amount to a book that is fun to read.

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