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Publisher Description

This article examines the organizational origins of political vulnerability among Chinese military veterans between 1949 and 2006. Recently declassified sources from urban and rural archives show that many veterans, even as they were officially considered core members of the ruling elite and hailed as the "flesh and blood of the revolution," nevertheless experienced frequent humiliation and discrimination; few citizens sympathized with their plight. The argument here is that much of this mistreatment can be traced to the failure of the state to provide veterans with the opportunity to organize in the context of either fraternal organizations or quasi-autonomous federations. In this respect, their predicament is notably different from their counterparts in democratic, fascist, or corporatist systems, or in other Leninist regimes. Why have veterans in Taiwan, Vietnam, and the former Soviet Union been allowed to form veterans organizations but veterans in the PRC--to their misfortune--have not? This article explains this anomaly. KEYWORDS: China, veterans, People's Liberation Army, veterans organizations, disability, rights, employment, conscription, patriotism, citizenship

GENRE
Nonfiction
RELEASED
2008
January 1
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
67
Pages
PUBLISHER
Lynne Rienner Publishers
SELLER
The Gale Group, Inc., a Delaware corporation and an affiliate of Cengage Learning, Inc.
SIZE
276
KB

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