• $7.99

Publisher Description

"Like The Handmaid's Tale, Simmons's book serves as essential commentary on women's rights."--Cosmopolitan.com

Once there was a time when men and women lived as equals, when girl babies were valued, and women could belong only to themselves. But that was ten generations ago. Now women are property, to be sold and owned and bred, while a strict census keeps their numbers manageable and under control. The best any girl can hope for is to end up as some man's forever wife, but most are simply sold and resold until they're all used up.

Only in the wilderness, away from the city, can true freedom be found. Aya has spent her whole life in the mountains, looking out for her family and hiding from the world, until the day the Trackers finally catch her.

Stolen from her home, and being groomed for auction, Aya is desperate to escape her fate and return to her family, but her only allies are a loyal wolf she's raised from a pup and a strange mute boy who may be her best hope for freedom . . . if she can truly trust him.

The Glass Arrow is a haunting, yet hopeful, new novel from Kristen Simmons, the author of the popular Article 5 trilogy.

At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

GENRE
Young Adult
RELEASED
2015
February 10
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
336
Pages
PUBLISHER
Tom Doherty Associates
SELLER
Macmillan
SIZE
1.3
MB
AUDIENCE
Grades 8-13

Customer Reviews

Figga5-1-01 ,

Love it!!!

This book was a pretty quick read, but an amazing one. I'm not going to spoil anything for you, but this book defiantly has action and romance. The only think I wish is that it was longer. I wish they talked about what happens after Aya wakes up. If she finds her family or not. But all in all, I loved this book.

Toni FGMAMTC ,

scary

I really liked this book. I let it sit around awhile before starting it, but after started, I wondered why I had waited so long. There were a couple of details within the plot that didn’t quite make sense to me. Girl babies were often frowned upon or killed, but the need of girls were in such high demand that they went great lengths to kidnap and buy or sale them. Also, the girls at the auction house had to be virgins or they were disfigured and thrown out as the lowest in society, but many were bought used and recycled (for lack of a better word) back through the house. So some of these dystopian world rules didn’t exactly connect, but the story was so interesting that I was able to overlook these irregularities. From the beginning, the story had me hooked. I couldn’t wait to see what Aya was going to do next in each situation. Also, it was fascinating discovering the classes and types of people.

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