• $7.99

Publisher Description

A family flees the crime-ridden city—and finds something worse—in “a brilliantly imagined horror story” by the New York Times–bestselling author (The Boston Globe).

After watching his asthmatic daughter suffer in the foul city air, Theodore Constantine decides to get back to the land. When he and his wife search New England for the perfect nineteenth-century home, they find no township more charming, no countryside more idyllic than the farming village of Cornwall Coombe. Here they begin a new life: simple, pure, close to nature—and ultimately more terrifying than Manhattan’s darkest alley.
 
When the Constantines win the friendship of the town matriarch, the mysterious Widow Fortune, they are invited to join the ancient festival of Harvest Home, a ceremony whose quaintness disguises dark intentions. In this bucolic hamlet, where bootleggers work by moonlight and all of the villagers seem to share the same last name, the past is more present than outsiders can fathom—and something far more sinister than the annual harvest is about to rise out of the earth.
 
Credited as the inspiration for Stephen King’s Children of the Corn, Thomas Tryon’s chilling novel was ahead of its time when first published, and continues to provoke abject terror in readers.
   

GENRE
Fiction & Literature
RELEASED
2013
September 24
LANGUAGE
EN
English
LENGTH
415
Pages
PUBLISHER
Open Road Media
SELLER
OpenRoad Integrated Media, LLC
SIZE
3.6
MB

Customer Reviews

tutankuamen ,

Very well-written.

The writing is excellent, and I should probably give it four stars, but, oh geesh, is this book dark! It is dark like his other renowned book, "The Other". I still remember that book, though I read it decades ago. I'm afraid, unfortunately, I'm going to remember this one just as long. "Harvest Home" reminds me of a kind of reverse "Stepford Wives".

Moderate reader ,

Very slow.

So slow. Gave up after a couple of hundred pages waiting for something to happen. My reading time is too valuable to waste turning pages and getting nowhere. Not for me.

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